Small-Space Vegetable Gardens: Growing Great Edibles in Containers, Raised Beds, and Small Plots

Small-Space Vegetable Gardens: Growing Great Edibles in Containers, Raised Beds, and Small Plots

by Andrea Bellamy

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Overview

“Size matters! Andrea Bellamy shares creative ways to grow a wide array of vegetables, fruits, and herbs in diminutive settings, year-round.” —Debra Prinzing, author, speaker, and podcaster

Small-Space Vegetable Gardens explains the basics of growing a bounty of edibles in a minimal amount of space. Andrea Bellamy shares all the knowledge she’s gained from years of gardening small. You’ll learn how to find and assess a space, how to plan and build a garden, and how to sow, grow, and harvest the 60 best edible plants. This hardworking and enthusiastic guide will help you take advantage of the space you have—whether it’s a balcony, a patio, a plot in a community garden, or even a small yard—to create the food garden of your dreams.
 

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781604695472
Publisher: Timber Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 12/31/2014
Pages: 216
Sales rank: 112,688
Product dimensions: 8.00(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)

About the Author

Andrea Bellamy is the creator of Heavy Petal, a blog devoted to urban organic gardening. She has a certificate in garden design from the University of British Columbia and studied permaculture methods for food production at an urban microfarm. She has been gardening since childhood and has grown food on rooftops, balconies, boulevards, and patios, and in community garden beds, window boxes, traffic circles, frontyards, and backyards. She is the Grow Food columnist for Edible Vancouver magazine, and her writing has appeared in a number of online and print publications. She lives in Vancouver, Canada, with her husband and daughter.

Read an Excerpt

Preface
All around us, a movement is taking place. People are rigging up window boxes for growing herbs, making room on the fire escape for a pot of tomatoes, renovating neglected flowerbeds to make way for raspberries and rhubarb, and convincing landlords to turn over a few square feet of lawn for food production. Families are joining waitlists for community garden plots, signing up for canning workshops, and getting to know their local growers at the farmers’ market.

The economy, self-sufficiency, sustainability, taste, health—whatever your reasons, it is always a good time to grow your own organic food. And you can do it, no matter how small your gardening space.

I grow food for all these reasons, but most of all I do it because it feels great. I love working outside and getting my hands dirty. I love connecting with other gardeners and sharing seeds and ideas. And I love harvesting something I have grown and eating it fresh that night for dinner. Yes, it is local food—really local food. But mainly it’s just good food.

For me, gardening has been a lifelong obsession and an experiment in trial and error. Lots of error. And, believe it or not, that is something I love about growing food—it keeps me on my toes. Just when I think I’ve finally mastered this urban farming thing, nature proves me wrong. The key, I think, is to pay attention—to celebrate each perfect potato, learn from mistakes, and, above all, enjoy the process.

This book walks you through the basics—and then some—of planning, creating, and tending an organic food garden in a small space. This is the book I wish I’d had when I was a new gardener, and I hope it will be a helpful resource and an inspiration to you. Most of all, I hope you get hooked on gardening and growing your own good food.
 

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
 
One: Finding Space
 
Two: Assessing Your Space
 
Three: Design in a Small Area
 
Four: Planning for Planting           
 
Five: Building your Garden           
 
Six: Optimizing Your Soil                
 
Seven: Sowing and Growing         
 
Eight: Keeping Plants Healthy      
 
Nine: Making the Most of Limited Space
 
Ten: Harvesting and Preparing for Next Year
 
Edibles from A to Z          
 

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