ISBN-10:
1592998771
ISBN-13:
9781592998777
Pub. Date:
Publisher:
Sausage Factory: The College Crier's Infamous Interviews of the Freaks and the Famous

Sausage Factory: The College Crier's Infamous Interviews of the Freaks and the Famous

by T. Virgil Parker

NOOK Book(eBook)

$2.99

Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
WANT A NOOK?  Explore Now
LEND ME® See Details

Overview

The world is full of things we don't want to look at too closely. Even the things we do want to scrutinize, it isn't always for the noblest of reasons. Sometimes we want to give the toupee a little tug, take a peek at Oz standing behind the curtain. Most of us are like that. Winston Churchill warned that people who love sausage should never watch it being made. However, for those intrepid few who positively obsess about sausage; they simply roll up their sleeves and feed the grinder. Many of the people in this book are among the most fulfilled people on Earth; others are facing demons that would blanch the bones of weaker souls. If you pump all the wonder, pain and glory you can snatch out of life into the grinder, what comes out of the other end may be sublime, or hideous, but will always be profound. One thing Winston failed to point out about sausage; you never really know what's in there. You might find out that your favorite midnight movie maven got her start acting for the most heralded art film director of all time. You may discover a man who had to make up a song, live, in front of half a million people; or a musician and filmmaker who is worshipped as a god in the South Pacific; an actress who impersonated someone else to audition for her first big acting role; a man who walked barefoot across the Middle East armed with only a guitar; a comedian funding an art museum for Chicanos by stepping in a bowl of cereal. You may encounter a journalist who was a hero for a generation casually grilling lobsters while firing up a fatty.


Related collections and offers

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781592998777
Publisher: Inkwater Press
Publication date: 11/27/2012
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 640 KB

About the Author

T. Virgil Parker lives in Rome, NY, with his consort and son, where he witnessed the destruction by fire of the Woodstock Music Festival. He has formally studied music, Shakespeare, Milton, and student loan statements. After an unpleasant excursion into banking, he currently publishes the College Crier and plays in the Renaissance and World music group Arethusa with his son.

Jessica Hopsicker was born in the wilds of Upstate New York. She spent most of her life in the outskirts of the Adirondack State Park in the small town of Hinckley; a town with possible ties with a notable would-be assassin. She majored in graphic design at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, until May of 04. At the end of her junior year, she left art school to follow a career in piracy. Instead, she found journalism. Jessica is currently back home working full time at the College Crier and dreaming of leaving for a warmer climate.

Carri Anne Yager lives in Rome, N.Y. with T. Virgil Parker, their fifteen-year-old son, T. Blake Parker, and a sadistic cat named Enoch. She has a B.A. in English and is working on an M.S. in Counseling Studies and is studying belly dancing. She has held positions in the fields of Education and Writing as well as face painting, in her spare time has done advanced work in trying to get T. Virgil Parker to work on the basement.

Read an Excerpt

Introduction: Sausage as a Metaphor

The world is full of things we don't want to look at too closely. Even the things we do want to scrutinize, it isn't always for the noblest of reasons. Sometimes we want to give the toupee a little tug, take a peek at Oz standing behind the curtain. Most of us are like that. Winston Churchill warned that people who love sausage should never watch it being made. However, for those intrepid few who positively obsess about sausage; they simply roll up their sleeves and feed the grinder.

Many of the people in this book are among the most fulfilled people on Earth; others are facing demons that would blanch the bones of weaker souls. If you pump all the wonder, pain and glory you can snatch out of life into the grinder, what comes out of the other end may be sublime, or hideous, but will always be profound.

One thing Winston failed to point out about sausage; you never really know what's in there. You might find out that your favorite midnight movie maven got her start acting for the most heralded art film director of all time. You may discover a man who had to make up a song, live, in front of half a million people; or a musician and filmmaker who is worshipped as a god in the South Pacific; an actress who impersonated someone else to audition for her first big acting role; a man who walked barefoot across the Middle East armed with only a guitar; a comedian funding an art museum for Chicanos by stepping in a bowl of cereal. You may encounter a journalist who was a hero for a generation casually grilling lobsters while firing up a fatty.

Physicians may keep us alive. The people we interview remind us to live. As we flail againstthe tyranny of selfhood we read stories, we watch movies, listen to music, pray, become intoxicated, seek danger. The people who assemble our inspirations are the people who build bridges to the far side of who we are. Are these mere nothings, a diversion? Sometimes. Sometimes we need to be diverted. Sometimes a snatch of a song, a happy ending, a powerful insight, is exactly what we need to take a stab at our own dreams. We take our work too seriously; we don't take our entertainment seriously enough. Enjoy the sausage.

T. Virgil Parker, October 8, 2008

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

• Introduction: Sausage as a Metaphor
• Jethro Tull's Ian Anderson: Knights and Tights
• All Aboard the Hell-Bound Train: An Interview With Hunter S. Thompson
• Fishing With Mitch: Mitch Hedberg
• Henry Rollins: 21st Century Renaissance Man
• Unleashing the Beast: An Interview With Henry Rollins
• Hey Mister Mustard Man: Mark Kikel
• Richie Havens: Grace of the Sun
• Michael Franti: Barefoot Bodhisattva
• Cheech Marin: The Freedom of Cheech
• Rachel Miner: Major Talent
• Mary Gaitskill: Critics Line Up to Get Her Wrong
• The Real Circus World: An Interview With The Amazing Blazing Tyler Fyre
• Clint Borgen: Pummeling Global Poverty
• Brazilian Girls: Something to Get Naked About
• Afroman: Higher and Higher
• Al Barr of the Dropkick Murphys: Songs of Solidarity
• Phil Lesh: All in the Music
• Warren Haynes and the Improvisational Lifeboat
• Suicide Girls: Missy Suicide Got the Ball Rolling, Nixon Suicide Took It on the Road
• Guster: At the Intersection of Beer Pong and National Public Radio
• Killer Keller: Keller Williams
• Chuck Palahniuk: Angels, Anarchy and Atavism
• Yellow Thunder Woman: Princess, Provocateur
• Elsewhere With Umphrey's
• William Gibson: Sci-Fi Icon Becomes Prophet of the Present
• Angelica: The Kerosene Queen
• Mickey Hart: The Rhythm of the Infinite
• Gogol Bordello's GreatGlobal Revolution: An Interview With Tommy Gobena
• Georgina Cates: A Woman of Many Parts
• Where's Poe Going?
• Enter the Haggis: Kicks in a Kilt
• Going Green With the Lizardman
• Jimmy Herring: A Good Catch
• Joan Osborne: How Sweet It Is
• Ryan Montbleau: The Montbleau Mystique
• Billy Howerdell: Chiaroscuro
• No Prima Donnas: Method Man Exclusive Interview
• Chuck Klosterman: Articulating the Unintelligible
• The Tossers: Free Booze and Tossing Off
• Elvira: Mistress of Darkness
• BALLS OF STEEL: Future World Emperor Dr. Phineas Waldolf Steel
• Music, Mythos, and Throwing a Song at Fascism: The Bob Weir Interview the *love kills theory: Sneaky Medicine
• The Beautiful Girls: More Than Skin Deep
• No Stranger to Fate: Dave King of Flogging Molly
• Haale: Finding Her Comet
• George Clinton: One Nation Under a Jam and Funkentelechy for All

Customer Reviews