In My Time: A Personal and Political Memoir

In My Time: A Personal and Political Memoir

by Dick Cheney, Liz Cheney

Narrated by Edward Herrmann

Unabridged — 20 hours, 0 minutes

In My Time: A Personal and Political Memoir

In My Time: A Personal and Political Memoir

by Dick Cheney, Liz Cheney

Narrated by Edward Herrmann

Unabridged — 20 hours, 0 minutes

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Overview

In his unmistakable voice and with an insider's eye on history, former Vice President Dick Cheney tells the story of his life and the nearly four decades he has spent at the center of American politics and power.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Audio

The 46th and perhaps most contentious vice president of the United States speaks his mind in this sprawling firsthand account of his political life. Naturally, the author’s slant is quite noticeable, particularly when he explains his role in the decision to invade Iraq following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Narrator Edward Herrmann delivers a compelling, straightforward performance with a journalistic tone. He gives the material the respect it deserves without editorializing. Cheney—who also provides narration—proves to be an excellent storyteller, ably reading his story with great respect for those who have lost their lives in America’s war against terror.While this memoir is unlikely to change Cheney’s hardened and callous image, it does offer a unique look at one of the most painful and controversial times in American history—and for that this audio is certainly worth a listen. A Threshold hardcover. (Aug.)

SEPTEMBER 2011 - AudioFile

It’s quite the adventure, in Cheney’s memoir, to be in the executive and legislative inner sanctums and policy-making forums of the nation from the early 1970s through the end of the George W. Bush administration. Edward Herrmann delivers a subtle, assured, patrician-sounding performance, aptly conveying Cheney’s focused conviction regarding the appropriateness of the great power that is placed in the government’s executive branch. Herrmann’s pleasing, authoritative tone provides perfect pacing, and he commands the material as if it were his own. The narration sounds utterly engaged and is presented in an unbiased, straightforward manner. The former vice president’s political fans and foes alike will take note of the often-brutal insights. Cheney himself delivers both the prologue and epilogue in a calm and unadorned manner. W.A.G. © AudioFile 2011, Portland, Maine

Kirkus Reviews

George W. Bush's vice president speaks--sort of. Cheney is a company man through and through, a servant of Republican functionaries from the time of LBJ to the recent past--if there is anything to be learned from this bloodless memoir, it is that. The author opens with the outrage of 9/11, in which one thought was foremost on his mind, apart from clearing the sky of planes: namely, "guaranteeing the continuity of a functioning United States government." In this, he writes, he was the essential element without which that continuity was unsustainable. Cheney's memoir is political to the extent that he plays the games of hardball politics with everyone he meets, and he makes sure to constantly remind readers of American supremacy and his centrality to it. Colin Powell was his ally until his taste for the war in Iraq weakened, whereupon it was clear to Cheney that Powell had to go. Ditto Condoleezza Rice and Donald Rumsfeld. Cheney's take on the world is clinical and even scholarly, much like that of Henry Kissinger (another figure whom Cheney does not seem to regard very highly). He is methodical but selective, as when he carefully accounts for his holdings in a certain corporation at the time of his vice presidency: "This was salary that I had already earned, so it was due to me whether the company was doing well or badly." The company, Halliburton, did well, of course, thanks to no-bid contracts in Iraq--but Cheney still professes irritation that anyone should doubt his clean hands, an irritation expressed by an infamous F-bomb on Capitol Hill ("It was probably not language I should have used on the Senate floor, but it was completely deserved"). The underlying point of the book is that Bush/Cheney were right in invading Iraq and waterboarding prisoners. Let the reader be the judge--until, that is, history decides on the matter.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940170805464
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Publication date: 08/30/2011
Edition description: Unabridged
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