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ISBN-10:
1551111748
ISBN-13:
2901551111741
Pub. Date:
04/07/1998
Publisher:
Broadview Press
Great Expectations / Edition 1

Great Expectations / Edition 1

by Charles Dickens Charles Dickens
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Overview

One of Charles Dickens most acclaimed works Great Expectations displays the author at the peak of his skills, working a collection of vivid characters through a sprawling plot studded with richly drawn scenes.

First appearing in 1861, Great Expectations offers a bounty of the pleasures only this author can provide. This is the sweeping story of Pip, an orphan growing up in an England Dickens brings to tumultuous life on the page. Pip must wrestle with injustice, poverty, duplicity and the trials of love while surrounded by a meticulously woven web of indelible characters. There are Miss Havisham, the spinster once left at the altar and still clad in her wedding dress, her adopted daughter Estella, beloved by Pip but curiously indifferent to all affection, and Abel Magwitch, the fearsome convict whose hidden nature affects Pip in a surprising fashion. These, and many other equally vital and amusing individuals are thrust together and pulled apart as they, and the reader, are borne along on a torrent of pure storytelling power. Great Expectations is arguably its author’s finest achievement and one of the greatest novels of the Victorian era.

With an eye-catching new cover, and professionally typeset manuscript, this edition of Great Expectations is both modern and readable.



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Product Details

ISBN-13: 2901551111741
Publisher: Broadview Press
Publication date: 04/07/1998
Series: Literary Texts Series
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 656
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.25(d)

About the Author

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) was an English author who achieved tremendous popularity during his lifetime and whose fiction, some of the most memorable and enduring of the Victorian era, is still beloved today. His compelling storytelling, vivid, often eccentric, characters and immersive descriptions of everyday life were lent depth by a profound compassion for victims of injustice and enhanced by sharp plotting that often used suspense and cliffhangers to ensure his readers were held rapt. People and details from his own, often hardscrabble, youth gave life to novels like Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Great Expectations and others.

Date of Birth:

February 7, 1812

Date of Death:

June 18, 1870

Place of Birth:

Portsmouth, England

Place of Death:

Gad's Hill, Kent, England

Education:

Home-schooling; attended Dame School at Chatham briefly and Wellington

Read an Excerpt

Chapter I.
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Great Expectations"
by .
Copyright © 2012 Charles Dickens.
Excerpted by permission of Penguin Young Readers Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Introduction
Acknowledgements
A Note on the Text
Charles Dickens: A Brief Chronology

GREAT EXPECTATIONS

  • Volume I
  • Volume II
  • Volume III

Explanatory Notes

Appendices: Contemporary Documents

Appendix A. The Composition of the Novel

  1. Dickens’s Working Memoranda
  2. Dickens’s Letters

Appendix B. Contemporary Responses to the Novel

  1. Athenaeum (13 July 1861)
  2. Examiner (20 July 1861)
  3. Saturday Review (20 July 1861)
  4. Atlantic Monday (September 1861)
  5. The Times (17 October 1861)
  6. British Quarterly Review (January 1862)
  7. Rambler (January 1862)
  8. Blackwood’s Magazine (May 1862)
  9. Temple Bar (September 1862)

Appendix C. On Class and Language

  1. Charles Dickens, “Hard Experiences in Boyhood” in John Forster, The Life of Charles Dickens (1872-74)
  2. Charles Dickens, “Travelling Abroad” The Uncommercial Traveller (1861)
  3. Alexis deTocqueville, The Old Regime and the French Revolution (1856)
  4. Sir James Fitzjames Stephen, “Gentlemen” Cornhill Magazine (1862)
  5. William Sewell, “Gentlemanly Manners” Sermons to Boys at Radley School (1854-69)
  6. John Ruskin, “Of Vulgarity,” Modern Painters (1860)
  7. J.H. Newman, “Liberal Knowledge Viewed in Relation to Religion,” The Scope and Nature of University Education (1859)
  8. Thomas Carlyle, “Labour,” Past and Present (1843)
  9. Samuel Smiles, “Character: The True Gentleman,” Self Help (1859)
  10. Mrs. Craik, John Halifax, Gentleman (1856)
  11. Thomas Hughes, Tom Brown’s Schooldays (1857)
  12. Reports on the State of Popular Education in England (1861)

Appendix D. On Crime & Punishment

  1. Mrs. Trimmer, The Charity School Spelling Book (1818)
  2. Charles Dickens, “Criminal Courts,” Sketches by Boz (1839)
  3. Charles Dickens, “A Visit to Newgate,” Sketches by Boz (1839)
  4. Report from the Select Committee on Transportation (1838)
  5. Henry Savery, Quintus Servinton (1830-31)
  6. Marcus Clarke, His Natural Life (1870-72)
  7. “The Autobiography of a Convict,” The Voices of Our Exiles (1854)
  8. John Binny, “Thieves and Swindlers,” in London Labour and the London Poor (1861)
  9. Thomas Carlyle, Model Prisons (1850)
  10. Thomas Beard, “A Dialogue Concerning Convicts,” All the Year Round (1861)
  11. Charles Dickens, “The Ruffian,” The Uncommercial Traveller (1868)

Maps and Illustrations Showing Settings

Map A: Estuaries of the Thames and Medway
Map B: City of London
Map C: Pip’s London
Illustration A. Smithfield Market
Illustration B. Barnard’s Inn
Illustration C. The River Front at Hammersmith
Illustration D. Covent Garden Market
Illustration E. The Royal Exchange
Illustration F. The Temple Stairs
Illustration G. London Bridge
Illustration H. Billingsgate Market

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What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"Dickens's figures belong to poetry, like figures of Dante or Shakespeare, in that a single phrase, either by them or about them, may be enough to set them wholely before us."  —T.S. Eliot

"All his characters are my personal friends—I am constantly comparing them with living persons, and living persons with them."  —Tolstoy

"Psychologically the latter part of Great Expectations is about the best thing Dickens ever did."  —George Orwell

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