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Exile: A Novel

Exile: A Novel

by Ann Ireland

NOOK Book(eBook)

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Overview

Short-listed for the 2002 Governor General's Literary Award for Fiction and the 2002 Roger Writers' Trust Fiction Prize

Rescued from the dangers he faces in a Latin American military dictatorship, writer Carlos Romero Estevez is given a new life in Vancouver. His rescuers, a benevolent group devoted to aiding oppressed writers, believe they've found a poster-boy. Carlos thinks he's found a new life, new freedom, and new, powerful friends. But soon everyone's illusions are dispelled, and Carlos finds life in exile to be a new kind of prison.

Now available in trade paperback format for the first time, Exile is the work of an author in full control of her considerable talents. Award-winning author Ann Ireland is the author of two previous novels: A Certain Mr. Takahashi (1985 - now available from The Dundurn Group), and The Instructor (1996). She teaches at Ryerson University, and is a past-president of PEN Canada.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781770707627
Publisher: Dundurn Press
Publication date: 04/01/2004
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 302
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Ann Ireland is the award-winning author of two novels, A Certain Mr. Takahashi (which was made into the feature film, The Pianist), and The Instructor. She teaches at Ryerson Polytechnic University where she coordinates the Writing program in Continuing Education. She is a past-president of PEN Canada.


Ann Ireland was the author of A Certain Mr. Takahashi (winner of the Seal First Novel Award), and Exile (shortlisted for the Governor General's Literary Award for Fiction and the Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize). The first edition of her novel The Instructor was a finalist for the Ontario Trillium Award.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"(Ireland's) characters are delightfully stereotypical, and she playfully puts people's prejudices and assumptions on display."

Customer Reviews