Easy Folk Songs for the Guitar with Downloadable MP3s

Easy Folk Songs for the Guitar with Downloadable MP3s

by Hank Aberle
Easy Folk Songs for the Guitar with Downloadable MP3s

Easy Folk Songs for the Guitar with Downloadable MP3s

by Hank Aberle

eBook

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Overview

This original collection presents more than 20 popular folk songs that have been specially arranged for beginning guitarists. The timeless melodies are supplemented with a helpful tutorial on guitar basics that offers tips on identifying the strings, tuning, and basic chord patterns and strums.
These arrangements of Skip to My Lou, He's Got the Whole World in His Hands, Oh! Susanna, Down in the Valley, Barbara Allen, and other tunes include advice for following the time signatures, strumming patterns, and other suggestions. Best of all, each song features a free MP3 download for students to listen to and play along with. The recordings will familiarize beginning guitarists with the pieces' melodies and tempos, and provide practical guidance for playing these beloved folk songs.


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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780486796666
Publisher: Dover Publications
Publication date: 08/11/2014
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: eBook
Pages: 48
File size: 7 MB

About the Author

Multi-instrumentalist and audio engineer Hank Aberle has performed in several bands, including Pop Art and Glitterhouse. He is the founder of the New York–based production company Aberle Sound.

Read an Excerpt

Easy Folk Songs for the Guitar with Downloadable MP3s


By Hank Aberle

Dover Publications, Inc.

Copyright © 2014 Dover Publications, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-486-79666-6



CHAPTER 1

Holding the Guitar


It's important to feel comfortable with the instrument.

Below are the two positions most often used by guitarists. Try them both and decide which one feels right for you.

Here, the guitar rests on the right leg.

Here, the guitar rests on the left leg, raised up by a guitar foot stool (available at most guitar shops). Alternatively, you could use a couple of thick books.


Identifying the Strings / Tuning

The guitar strings are identified either by number or by note name.

The 6th string is the thickest, the 1st string is the thinnest.

Always remember to check that the guitar is in tune before you start to play.

You can purchase an electric tuner from your local music shop, or you can tune the guitar to itself using the method described below:

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]


Tuning the Guitar to Itself

While pressing down on the 6th string, 5th fret, pluck the string and compare it to the 5th open string.

They should sound like the same note. Once they are tuned in unison, try pressing down on the 5th string, 5th fret, and comparing it with the open 4th string.

Repeat for all strings except when comparing the 3rd string to the 2nd.

This should be done by pressing down on the 3rd string, 4th fret, while comparing it to the second open string.


The Right Hand

Before attempting your first song, it is important to get familiar with the strumming patterns for the right hand.

Here, the right hand is shown with the thumb placed on the 6th string, while the fingers are drawn into the palm.

The thumb (T) plucks the 6th string and the fingers are then extended downward across the strings to create the strum (S).

Using the right hand only, try a strumming pattern on the open strings as shown in the tablature below for two 4/4 measures. The six lines represent the guitar strings.

The bottom line represents the 6th string and the top line represents the 1st string.

In these two measures, try alternating the thumb between the 6th and 4th strings.


Playing a Chord

Chords are played by pressing on the strings with the left hand, then plucking and strumming with the right hand.

The fingers of the left hand are numbered to correspond to the chord diagrams shown throughout this book.


The D Chord

This is the chord diagram for the D chord. The strings 1–6 are shown vertically while the frets are shown horizontally. The X indicates that the string is not used, and the O indicates that the string is played in its open position.

Now try fingering the D chord: Press firmly onto the strings with your fingertips, as shown in the diagram, using the fingers indicated on the black dots. Be sure not to touch any adjacent strings. If not done properly, buzzing and/or muting may occur. Be patient, though, as a lot of practice will be necessary for the development of the muscles in your fingers.

When you are certain you are fingering the chord properly, you may proceed to pluck and strum with your right hand. Use this pattern:

Thumb – Strum – Thumb – Strum: T S T S

This pattern corresponds to a count of 4/4 (four beats per measure): 1 – 2 – 3 – 4

Below you will find two measures of guitar tablature in 4/4.

This represents both the fingering of the left hand and the pattern of plucking and strumming of the right hand.

There are 6 strings shown. The bottom string corresponds to the 6th (thickest) string of the guitar.

The numbers show the frets that are used by the left hand in an alternating bass pattern.

The thumb (T) plucks the open 4th string and the downward strum (S) is on the 3rd, 2nd, and 1st strings.

The thumb alternates between the open 4th and open 5th strings.


The A7 Chord

Try playing the A7 chord (diagram at left).


Skip to My Lou

After you have played the song through several times, try singing along.

Now try playing this next song using an alternating bass string pattern:

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]


He's Got the Whole World in His Hands

(Optional) Additional Verses

2. He's got the wind and the rain in His hands,
He's got the wind and the rain in His hands,
He's got the wind and the rain in His hands,
He's got the whole world in His hands.

3. He's got the sun and the moon in His hands,
He's got the sun and the moon in His hands,
He's got the sun and the moon in His hands,
He's got the whole world in His hands.

4. He's got the little bitty baby in His hands,
He's got the little bitty baby in His hands,
He's got the little bitty baby in His hands,
He's got the whole world in His hands.

5. He's got you and me brother in His hands,
He's got you and me brother in His hands,
He's got you and me brother in His hands,
He's got the whole world in His hands.

6. He's got everybody here in His hands,
He's got everybody here in His hands,
He's got everybody here in His hands,
He's got the whole world in His hands.


The G Chord

You will most likely find it more difficult to play the G chord than the D or A7 chords. The stretch may seem somewhat awkward at first, but with practice, you will soon feel more comfortable.

First, place your first and second fingers (index and middle) in their proper positions, as in the diagram to the left. Once they are firmly in place, position the 4th finger (pinky)—or 3rd finger (ring)—to complete the chord. Strum the G chord according to the tablature shown below, alternating the thumb between the 6th and 4th strings.

T = Thumb S = Strum

The next few songs will allow you to practice the chords you have learned so far.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Easy Folk Songs for the Guitar with Downloadable MP3s by Hank Aberle. Copyright © 2014 Dover Publications, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Contents

Holding the Guitar,
Identifying the Strings / Tuning,
The Right Hand,
Playing a Chord (The D Chord),
Skip to My Lou (The A7 Chord),
He's Got the Whole World in His Hands,
Oh, My Darling Clementine,
The Streets of Laredo,
The G Chord,
On Top of Old Smokey,
Sweet Betsy from Pike,
Frankie and Johnny (The D7 Chord),
Down in the Valley,
Froggie Went A-Courtin',
Alternate Strum,
Blue Tail Fly,
Oh! Susanna,
Swing Low, Sweet Chariot,
Down By the Riverside,
Jesse James (The C Chord),
The Midnight Special,
Red River Valley,
Michael Row the Boat Ashore (The E Minor Chord),
The Drunken Sailor,
Pretty Peggy-O,
The Wayfaring Stranger (The A Minor Chord),
The Cruel War is Raging,
John Browns Body (The B7 Chord),
Worried Man Blues (The E and A Chords),
Patrick on the Railway (The E7 Chord),
Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (The D Minor Chord),
John Henry (The G7 Chord),
Barbara Allen (The F Chord),
Railroad Bill,

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